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Stories: Melody McNulty

When Baldwin Park police observed an 85-year-old woman sleeping in her car, they reached out to her and learned she’d lost her home within the past year. BPP located a motel in Baldwin Park willing to house her at no cost for two weeks. On a Wednesday, as her stay was ending, Officers Cynthia Espinoza and David Leon brought her to us for immediate assistance. I gave her a motel voucher good through Friday, and one of the officers paid out of pocket to extend the stay through Monday morning. Before checkout time at 11 a.m. Monday, I had found her a room for rent. She moved in at 9:30 a.m. with a senior couple and another client I had previously housed in the home. The couple who own the residence had come to us for assistance a year ago, fearing the loss of their home and hoping to offer rooms for rent. Now all rooms in the lovely, large Monrovia home are filled with seniors,  and the property is no longer at risk. The 85-year-old woman is on a short waiting list for senior apartments while staying in her new home.

Melody McNulty

When Baldwin Park police observed an 85-year-old woman sleeping in her car, they reached out to her and learned she’d lost her home within the past year. BPP located a motel in Baldwin Park willing to house her at no cost for two weeks. On a Wednesday, as her stay was ending, Officers Cynthia Espinoza and David Leon brought her to us for immediate assistance. I gave her a motel voucher good through Friday, and one of the officers paid out of pocket to extend the stay through Monday morning. Before checkout time at 11 a.m. Monday, I had found her a room for rent. She moved in at 9:30 a.m. with a senior couple and another client I had previously housed in the home. The couple who own the residence had come to us for assistance a year ago, fearing the loss of their home and hoping to offer rooms for rent. Now all rooms in the lovely, large Monrovia home are filled with seniors, and the property is no longer at risk. The 85-year-old woman is on a short waiting list for senior apartments while staying in her new home.

Stories: Enika McLane, Caseworker

Recently a Pasadena family reached out to us, referred by the Red Cross. They had just lost all their belongings in a fire at their home. While thankfully nobody was hurt, the single mother and her college age daughter were clearly suffering from extreme trauma. Fortunately, they had been moved to another apartment in the same building while the cause of the fire was being investigated, avoiding the need to find immediate shelter. The mother asked for our help in purchasing two mattresses for herself and her daughter to use in the empty apartment. I submitted a grant request to our agency for the cost and began  working with a furniture store to arrange the purchase and delivery date and time. It’s hard to put into words the mixture of trauma and gratitude I saw in the mother’s eyes as we were working with her. It feels really good to know our team could be there for her family.

2018 Back to School

Photos by Lyd & Mo

Summer 2018 Newsletter

Monrovia Warehouse/Building Ribbon Cutting


Photos by Lyd&Mo

Foothill Unity Open House

Spring 2018 Newsletter

THE FACTS BEHIND SENIOR HUNGER

Nearly one in every six seniors in America faces the threat of hunger and not being properly nourished. This applies to those who aren’t sure where their next meal is coming from and those who don’t have access to the healthiest possible food options. The issue is severe enough that the AARP reports that seniors face a healthcare bill of more than $130 billion every year due to medical issues stemming from senior hunger.

Senior hunger is an expansive issue that requires an understanding of exactly what constitutes a senior being “hungry,” the issues that stem from senior hunger, and how seniors who are hungry can be helped.

To understand the concept of seniors being hungry, you must understand what it means to be “food insecure.” When you are food insecure, it means that there is “limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods or limited or uncertain ability to acquire acceptable foods in socially acceptable ways,” as defined by a study published in The Journal of Nutrition. Essentially, it means that you aren’t receiving and/or don’t have access to the necessary foods and nutrients to help sustain your life.

The concept of being “hungry” is a state-of-mind, meaning that there is a physical aspect to the lack of food. Attending to an area where people are hungry and basically starving is a much more immediate and severe problem to solve. Being food insecure, on the other hand, helps include people who may have enough food and don’t technically live consistently in hunger, but the food they are eating—usually in large amounts—isn’t up to nutritional and dietary standards.

In 2006, the USDA broke down food insecurity into two categories to help determine how food insecure someone is: 13%Of Households In America Are Food Insecure

Low Food Security

While there may not be an overall reduction in how much food someone is intaking, there may be a lower quality and variety of your diet. For instance, there may be reduced amounts of fresh vegetables and meats, but that may be replaced with fast food. In this category, people don’t miss many meals, but the type of meals that are being eaten diminish in quality.

Very Low Food Security

When you have very low food security, your health and ability to correct it with healthy food is in a dire situation. To be assigned this categorization, the USDA says there must be “multiple indications of disrupted eating patterns and reduced food intake,” meaning you’re often missing meals and not eating enough to survive.

2017 Foothill Christmas